Sunday, 22 Oct 2017
PHOTO GALLERY
Hanoi Mid-Autumn Festival in the past
Updated at Wednesday, 04 Oct 2017, 10:59
Here are selected photographs of the Mid-Autumn Festival in early 20th century Hanoi. The photos are part of an exhibition showcased at the Heritage House at 87 Ma May Street, Hang Buom ward, Hanoi.
The management board of Hanoi’s Old Quarter introduces this unique art installation displaying the traditional Mid-Autumn Festival of a family in Hanoi with photos from the early 20th century provided by the Vietnam Academy of Social Sciences.
Artisans make large star lamps on the sidewalks, attracting the attention of both children and adults. Chicken fighting – traditional toys are made of wood in 1937. Animal-shaped toys made of powder were popular toys for kids in the early 20th century.
In the past, on Mid-Autumn Festival, the sky is pure and the moon is bright. It is said that in mid-August, mid-autumn, the moon is at its brightest. In the evening, children play with the moon, and the elderly, especially writers, enjoy the moon.
The Mid-Autumn Festival (eighth lunar month) was the most important festival of the year for children. Hang Gai Street would become the center for excitement. Skillful pupils who were poor could earn a little money. They would use their money to buy paper, bamboo, and turpentine to make toys. People in Hang Ma Street would join in and make lion masks.
Bookshops would be replaced by toy shops. The streets would fill with people and children could ask their parents’ permission to stay out late. Hàng Gai and Hàng Trống Streets would fill with drums of all sizes, and children would be permitted to beat the drums all day long.
Hang Thiec Street would also be busy. Bowls and basins would make way for gaudily painted, tin toys such as butterflies, rabbits beating drums, toy cars, and ships.
From the eleventh day of August, all children would have a lamp, a small drum, and a lion mask. In the evening, they would light candles, beat drums and dance with the masks.
Older children would organize processions. Each procession would have ten lamps and a big head of a lion; an oxcart carrying large drums and flags would go at the fore. These drums create rhythms for children under the lion mask to dance. Families with children would organize feasts to wait for the moon. On the table would be moon cakes, along with some grapefruit.
The management board of Hanoi’s Old Quarter introduces this unique art installation displaying the traditional Mid-Autumn Festival of a family in Hanoi with photos from the early 20th century provided by the Vietnam Academy of Social Sciences.
The management board of Hanoi’s Old Quarter introduces this unique art installation displaying the traditional Mid-Autumn Festival of a family in Hanoi with photos from the early 20th century provided by the Vietnam Academy of Social Sciences.
Traditional toys for the Mid-Autumn Festival are on sale in Hang Gai Street, August 1926.
Traditional toys for the Mid-Autumn Festival are on sale in Hang Gai Street, August 1926.
Children are eager to enjoy animal-shaped lanterns and the vast array of traditional toys at Hang Gai Street.
Children are eager to enjoy animal-shaped lanterns and the vast array of traditional toys at Hang Gai Street.
Artisans make large star lamps on the sidewalks, attracting the attention of both children and adults.
Artisans make large star lamps on the sidewalks, attracting the attention of both children and adults.
Chicken fighting – traditional toys are made of wood in 1937.
Chicken fighting – traditional toys are made of wood in 1937.
Crab-shaped lamp.
Crab-shaped lamp.
 Animal-shaped toys made of powder were popular toys for kids in the early 20th century.
Animal-shaped toys made of powder were popular toys for kids in the early 20th century.
Dragon-dance performance in Hang Thiec Street.
Dragon-dance performance in Hang Thiec Street.
Women make full moon cakes in Hang Duong Street, 1928.
Women make full moon cakes in Hang Duong Street, 1928.
A Mid-Autumn Festival tray of a family in Hang Thiec Street.
A Mid-Autumn Festival tray of a family in Hang Thiec Street.
Tuyet Nhung - VOV
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